Patrick Sherman of Roswell Flight Test Crew shares beginner tips of how to fly first-person view (FPV).

Is it easier to select a trainer model that just requires three channels to operate? Are four channels better? This brief introduction might help you decide.

If you are trying to choose a trainer model, you may wonder about what the differences are and which size to purchase. This article provides suggestions for which size trainer is right for you.

Radio Control (RC) takes up the major portion of current interest in the hobby of flying model airplanes. This article will give an introduction to how electrical power systems work in modeling. Topics include advantages and disadvantages, the components that make up an electric power system, and the basics of charging.

There are fun ways to learn using the left stick that are effective and quick. We are going to entice you into learning rudder and throttle control by offering several easy, fun practice maneuvers and then finishing with the attractive aerobatic performance known as a stall turn.

The easiest way to join or renew your membership is to visit AMA's website at https://www.modelaircraft.org/joinrenew.aspx
or Call the AMA at (800) 435-9262 - 1-800-I-FLY-AMA

It has long been said that the key to a good landing is a good approach to the runway, in other words, one that requires few corrections. Landing is not hard when the pilot can get the airplane to the runway without having to make many corrections.

When preparing for take-off for the first flight of your model, it is important to make sure that everything on your plane is in place so you will have a safe flight. This article explains tasks that need to be completed before your model flies for the first time. Since there are many tasks to complete, a maiden flight checklist is included in the article, so it will be easier to remember all the tasks that need to be completed in order for your first flight to go smoothly.

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The first model aviation club was formed in 1908.. by a woman! Ms. Todd, from her childhood, was always interested in how things worked. She would disassemble toys, typewriters, and was once even scolded for using her mother’s scissors to cut wire. This interest in tinkering led her to design and patent a type writer copy holder in 1896. By the turn of the century her interest turned to aviation, and she began to experiment with rubber-powered models and airships. In 1906 she displayed one of her aircraft at the Aero Club of America show, held in Grand Central Palace, New York.