Introducing the AMA Alpha! The Alpha is a rubber-powered airplane that provides amazing flight duration, controlled flight, and can easily be disassembled and taken home to fly again.

Introducing the AMA Alpha! The Alpha is a rubber-powered airplane that provides amazing flight duration, controlled flight, and can easily be disassembled and taken home to fly again.

Introducing our new educational resource for sUAS hobbyists, Learn sUAS!

Approximately $40,000 is available, in endowments and scholarships, to be distributed in various amounts on the basis of AMA modeling activities, scholastic achievement, and citizenship achievement.

This online training course will provide commercial UAS pilots the knowledge needed to pass the FAA’s required Remote Pilot—small Unmanned Aircraft Systems certification standards test.

This hands-on training course will provide public safety officers the knowledge needed to use UAS technology safely and effectively in their daily jobs.

Does your club want to introduce model aviation to its youth, newcomers, friends and neighbors? Does your club want to receive local recognition and benefits for being active in your community?
If you answered "yes," you will want to learn more about the AMA's TAG grant program. For more information, email Jessy Symmes or call (765) 287-1256, ext. 516.

Our partnership with the Civil Air Patrol, one of the national leaders in aerospace educational offerings, provides the opportunity for cadets of every unit to experience flight through Radio Control model aircraft.

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Learn about Life Weight and Thrust in this interactive game

Learn about Pitch, Yaw, and Roll in this interactive game

Learn to build the FPG-9 airplane in this interactive tutorial

NASA

NASA is a grant partner in the permanent display of model aviation in the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis (the world’s largest), Flight Adventures unit of study, and Wings Over Indiana, a 60-minute PBS documentary television show on the role of models in aviation and aerospace.

Sir George Cayley, often called the Father of Aeronautics, designed a helicopter powered by a bow-string mechanism with feather blades (similar to the reproduction shown here). Later, he experimented by flying a model with multiple adjustable surfaces, allowing him to understand how every change affected the model’s flight. This model is a ½ scale replica of his original 1804 model. Cayley used the data from these experiments to publish his On Aerial Navigation in 1809.