Introducing the AMA Alpha! The Alpha is a rubber-powered airplane that provides amazing flight duration, controlled flight, and can easily be disassembled and taken home to fly again.

Does your club want to introduce model aviation to its youth, newcomers, friends and neighbors? If you answered "yes," you will want to learn more about the AMA's TAG grant program.

June 7th -13th, 2020 at the International Aeromodeling Center in Muncie, Indiana.
Camp is open to beginner through advanced pilots ages 13-19. Learn all about flying from our award-winning instructors. Space is limited; reserve your spot early!

Approximately $40,000 is available, in endowments and scholarships, to be distributed in various amounts on the basis of AMA modeling activities, scholastic achievement, and citizenship achievement.

University Model Aviation Student Club (UMASC) is discounted membership and charter program for college students!

Model Aviation Student Club, or MASC, is a chartering program for school aeromodeling clubs!

Introducing a drone STEM program from the Academy of Model Aeronautics, UAS4STEM!

Introducing the AMA Alpha! The Alpha is a rubber-powered airplane that provides amazing flight duration, controlled flight, and can easily be disassembled and taken home to fly again.

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Learn about Life Weight and Thrust in this interactive game

Learn about Pitch, Yaw, and Roll in this interactive game

Learn to build the FPG-9 airplane in this interactive tutorial

Soaring Society of America

The Soaring Society of America, or SSA, was formed in 1932 to foster and promote all phases of full-scale soaring or gliding.

Sir George Cayley, often called the Father of Aeronautics, designed a helicopter powered by a bow-string mechanism with feather blades (similar to the reproduction shown here). Later, he experimented by flying a model with multiple adjustable surfaces, allowing him to understand how every change affected the model’s flight. This model is a ½ scale replica of his original 1804 model. Cayley used the data from these experiments to publish his On Aerial Navigation in 1809.