Introducing the AMA Alpha! The Alpha is a rubber-powered airplane that provides amazing flight duration, controlled flight, and can easily be disassembled and taken home to fly again.

STEM Model Aviation curriculum created by Science Educators for Science Educators. Funding provided by Alcoa.

The AMA e-newsletter that's especially for you, the young person interesting in flying models. Expect each monthly issue to be packed with fun and exciting stories focused on, or about youth in aviation.

RSESTeP is a three-tiered (Satellite, R/C Plane and Ground-truthing) Remote Sensing Earth Science Teacher Program that trains 4th – 12th grade classroom science teachers how to use cutting edge NASA resources and technologies to implement Earth Science Missions with students and communities.

At Southwest Airlines, we’re committed to bringing America’s future leaders unique learning opportunities by committing our resources and time to inspire students and help them define, articulate, and plan for future success.

Get young people excited about learning with Estes Model Rockets!

The Academy of Model Aeronautics is proud to have available the Mobile RC Experience – providing your event attendees the opportunity to try flying a radio controlled model aircraft!

We know you will find the information here to be very useful as you prepare your presentation for a student classroom or children in a community group.

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Learn about Life Weight and Thrust in this interactive game

Learn about Pitch, Yaw, and Roll in this interactive game

Learn to build the FPG-9 airplane in this interactive tutorial

NASA

NASA is a grant partner in the permanent display of model aviation in the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis (the world’s largest), Flight Adventures unit of study, and Wings Over Indiana, a 60-minute PBS documentary television show on the role of models in aviation and aerospace.

Sir George Cayley, often called the Father of Aeronautics, designed a helicopter powered by a bow-string mechanism with feather blades (similar to the reproduction shown here). Later, he experimented by flying a model with multiple adjustable surfaces, allowing him to understand how every change affected the model’s flight. This model is a ½ scale replica of his original 1804 model. Cayley used the data from these experiments to publish his On Aerial Navigation in 1809.