The flying wing flies

spanload implications for aircraft and birds

NASA

NASA is a grant partner in the permanent display of model aviation in the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis (the world’s largest), Flight Adventures unit of study, and Wings Over Indiana, a 60-minute PBS documentary television show on the role of models in aviation and aerospace.

This NASA documentary shows the history of aviation from the years of 1917 to 1967.

This student-produced video details the students' research, using a student-built subscale flying-wing sailplane that proved that proverse yaw can be achieved just as birds achieve it -- through wingtip aerodynamics alone.

Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT) is a program that was developed to improve and transition automatic collision avoidance technologies throughout the aviation industry. ACAT is designed to prevent a ground collision for fully functional aircraft by automatically taking control of the aricraft and flying it away from the ground.

Aviation enthusiasts will love this Emmy award-winning documentary. Convenient segments also make it ideal for educators who want to bring aspects of flight into the classroom.

Jerry will be speaking about his team's development of a R/C, 1/3 scale model Twin Ventus Glider with a Mini Sprite Rocket to conduct flight research on towed glider, air-launch vehicle possibilities. Jerry is an accomplished R/C aerobatic pilot competing on a regional and national level.

RJ Gritter, a professional remote control pilot, was here at the museum helping us get ready for our newest experience, CSI: Flight Adventures. On This Week's WOW, you'll see amazing footage of RJ flying his model aircraft through the museum!

This video uncovers the workings, tools, and rationale of the scaled aircraft lab at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base. Watch commercial-off-the-shelf aircraft, one-of-a-kind designs, powered aircraft, and gliders take-off, fly, and land. The chief pilot and designer of the lab explains how and why they do what they do.

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